In Chicago and Beyond, Bail Reformers Win Big in Fight to End Money Bail

Chicago is poised to stop incarcerating people just because they can't pay their way out. (Photo: Marilyn Nieves / iStock / Getty Images Plus)Chicago is poised to stop incarcerating people just because they can’t pay their way out. (Photo: Marilyn Nieves / iStock / Getty Images Plus)

As of July 17, 2017, Cook County, which includes Chicago and the surrounding suburbs, is poised to become the largest jurisdiction in the country to stop incarcerating people pretrial, solely because they cannot post money bail. Thanks in large part to a sustained push by activists over the past several years, the Cook County Circuit Court’s Chief Judge has announced a new order that instructs judges making bail decisions to impose monetary bail only in amounts that people can pay. If judges follow the order, it could lead to the end of money bail in Cook County, setting a historic precedent on an issue that impacts hundreds of thousands of people around the country.

Right now, more than 4,000 people are incarcerated in Chicago’s Cook County Jail because they cannot post monetary bail. They have been granted release by a judge, but remain in cages because they cannot pay a certain amount of money to secure their freedom. This is the pretrial justice system wrought by money bail, and it is mirrored across the country: 443,000 people are incarcerated before trial in the US, 90 percent of them because they cannot afford to post a monetary bail. In fact, there

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/394341367/KsAYUBTbOsMzf6Mr?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

Where is money headed?

 

The daily fluctuations of financial markets and the fractious debates over economic policy are concealing something deeper and much more disturbing. The future of money itself is in question

xxxxxA decade after world banking almost collapsed in the global financial crisis, the questions raised have not been answered. The only way to keep the system going—kick the can down the street, as it were—has been to reduce the base interest rate in the developed world to almost zero. It has been an admission that the cost of capital, the very cornerstone of capitalism, no longer applies.

This drama has several elements, some familiar and some new. One is soaring global debt, which is over $US200 trillion, or 325 per cent of global GDP. Although that aggregate is not necessarily as scary as it looks at first glance, it is too large to eliminate with inflation, which is how debt in the twentieth century was typically dealt with.

The problem persists because of an arithmetic truism. Compound interest on borrowings always grows faster than economic growth. The former increases geometrically, the latter is linear. Eventually, debt becomes too large and something has to be done.

As the economist Michael Hudson has pointed out, the pattern goes back thousands of years, to the Bronze Age. To solve the problem, civilisations had debt jubilees:

‘So central to Israelite moral values was this tradition that it framed the composition of both the Old and New Testaments. Radical as the idea of cancelling

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/394342544/IQgc5UDDZrePgP0N?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

The family fun day raising money for poorly Olly’s bucket list

A family fun day has been organised to help fund a bucket list for a little boy battling cancer.

Friends, family and the public have rallied around Olly McKay – a five-year old currently undergoing his third round of chemotherapy after he was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma in 2012.

Over £20,000 has been raised so far to help fund Olly’s own wish list, including a trip to Legoland and his parents, Emma and Paul, would love for their only son to see real snow for the first time.

A superhero, princess, and Star Wars disco event organised by Gemma Harper, friend of the McKays, and her company Kiddi Kraze events hopes to increase the fundraising pot further.

“No child should have to go through this and it’s absolutely heartbreaking,” Gemma said.

“Oliver is our little superhero, so incredibly brave and strong and has dealt with more than most adults and done so with a smile on his face. So please come along, share with all your family and friends and help us make his wishes come true.”


Read next Ten-year-old friends raise over £1,000 for Olly’s bucket list


Many companies across Plymouth will be giving their time for free to help raise as much as possible for brave Olly on the day.

Nandos have offered raffle prizes as well as 100 chicken wings for the day, Force For Charity characters and Plymouth Party Princesses/Superheroes will be attending as well as Small Print Discos and The Dogs Dinner will be

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/394343854/lZkjGYA2WUYKpdP_?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

Police save 8-year-old girl’s birthday after her money was taken during burglary

WICHITA FALLS, TX (KFDX) Several police officers in Wichita Falls, Texas rushed to help a little girl after her savings was stolen just one day before her eighth birthday.

Cynthia Caldwell and her youngest daughter, Mia, were out of town when their house was burglarized and the thief made off with the $61 Mia recently saved.

Mia’s older sister was home at the time.

“So about 2:30 in the morning, she heard rustling in my drawers and she walks out of her room and catches somebody in my room,” Cynthia Caldwell said. “She said, ‘What are you doing in my mom’s room?’ And he just walks out the door.”

When Mia arrived back home she immediately went to her bedroom and noticed all of her money was gone.

“I was really mad and I started bursting out in tears because I’ve been saving this money for my birthday,” Mia said.

 

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/394344245/eJE2CptmRpJ6AYiE?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj