Jesus, big money and the GOP: Before Fox News, there was “The 700 Club”

Before there was Fox News, there was “The 700 Club.” The thousands or perhaps millions of Christians influenced by “The 700 Club” over the last four decades are good people. Their intentions are noble. They mostly wish that others would find the peace and contentment they’ve discovered for themselves. Along the way, however, the essential gospel call about feeding sheep and lambs has been overshadowed by a perceived need to not just challenge the evolution of our culture but also directly participate in what they view as its restoration. Certain Christian leaders whose motives—while presented as above reproach—have fed them Biblical mandates that seem to justify this participation. However, a deeper examination reveals that the gospel being most preached today is a form of self-centeredness: the gospel of self.

I know this, because I helped teach it while serving as Pat Robertson’s producer and executive producer during a most critical point in the TV program’s development, the 1980s, when Pat himself decided that God had called him to run for president and that he would win. The story of how this happened is my story, and the gospel of self is the dark side of that chronicle.

History will record that “The 700 Club” was the taproot of that which moved the Republican Party to the right and provided the political support today for a man like Donald Trump. A 2015 Harvard report concluded that right-wing media was driving the GOP, not Republican leadership, but this assumes that in order

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/383649907/_l2R6uSuMojBCvKO?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

Read full story about a woman who sold her children for money

A woman was arrested by an Area M Police Command, Idimu, Lagos for allegedly selling four out of her five children to different buyers without the knowledge of her husband.

The woman simply identified as Vicky was arrested following a petition by her husband to the Area Commander, Assistant Commissioner of Police, ACP Austines Akika.

Police sources said the suspect was selling the children one after the other and successfully sold four, leaving out only one, PM express reported.

It was learnt that she lied to her husband that she took the kids to their relation until the husband later discovered she has sold them.

Her strange commercial activity was exposed after she sold the last child for N400,000 and her husband was tipped by a neighbour.

The husband reported to the police and she was arrested and detained at the Command cell.

She was said to have already confessed to the police while efforts were already being made to rescue the children and arrest the buyers.

It was reported that the woman was able to carry out the illegal sales without her husband’s knowledge because the husband, who rented an apartment in Idimu area of Alimosho local government, works outside Lagos, where he stays during the week and returns home weekend or monthly.

It was gathered that the woman told her husband that she took the kids to her relatives to cover her tracks.

The woman is still in detention while the police are carrying out investigations to locate the whereabouts of

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/383651508/Q6O7QpDBchHsVIgQ?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

7 smart money habits of effective people

racegoers wealthyThey always know their end goal.Darrian Traynor/Getty

Just like bacon ice cream and “Call Me Maybe” parodies, self-help trends come and go.

But Stephen Covey’s game-changing book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” which has sold more than 25 million copies, is one of a handful of titles that’s still as relevant today as when it was first published 28 years ago. 

Bonus: It’s also a pretty useful blueprint for managing money. Here’s how you can use the book’s touchstone habits to up your financial game.

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/383657923/rG1onBEBeq8MX1nN?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

Seized $43bn: I have evidence money belongs to Rivers State, will soon release it – Wike insists

Governor Nyesom Wike of Rivers State, says he has evidence showing that the huge cash recently seized by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, EFCC, from an apartment in Ikoyi, Lagos State belongs to his state government.

Featuring on Channel’s television, Wike disclosed that at the appropriate time, the evidence will be revealed for the world to see.

The governor said he would not give any evidence yet, so that the Federal Government would not know the state government’s moves.

He said, “The ultimatum I gave on the recovered money hasn’t elapsed. Yes, I did that, but you have lawyers working with you. They tell you; wait, we don’t want to go by the way you have said. Although I am a lawyer too, I am sitting as a governor. I am directly affected and emotionally involved.

“The so-called government has set up a committee. Let’s wait and see what the committee would say. Let’s see whether they will or will not invite the state government.

“We cannot make submissions to the committee because you don’t know where they meet; you don’t know where they sit. Everybody knows the money belongs to Rivers State. Who are all the people making contentions about the money? They are the same government. Don’t mind that the NIA DG was not appointed by the present government. He was in government.

“Despite claims by the NIA DG, the CBN came out to say, ‘how did you get this money? We didn’t give

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/383661824/7HiESaEwUA4GVWT3?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

‘This also gives me purpose’: Stroke survivor raises money for Ottawa rehab facility

Five years after suffering a brain hemorrhage and stroke while at sea, retired naval commander Tim Kerr wants to give back to the rehab facility in Ottawa where he spent his recovery.

Kerr, who now works at Veterans Affairs in Charlottetown, will walk the half marathon route at the Ottawa Race Weekend to raise money and awareness for Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital. 

“I had no idea that place existed before I had my stroke,” said Kerr, 48, who will also carry a weighted backpack, with one pound for every $100 he has raised, now more than $6,500.

“I realized how important it is to make sure that every community has a resource like Bruyère, like the Queen Elizabeth Hospital here in Charlottetown,” said Kerr.

“A facility that’s able to do not only the critical care for strokes to make sure you live through the event, but also the rehabilitation which is so critical to getting as much of your life back as you can.”

“This also gives me purpose,” he said. 

Tim Kerr in uniform

Tim Kerr was on board a Canadian naval ship heading on his final deployment when he suffered a brain hemorrhage and stroke. (Submitted by Tim Kerr)

‘Very dramatic’

Kerr’s story starts with a dramatic at sea medical rescue. He was commanding HMCS Algonquin on its way to a military exercise in Hawaii. The ship had just left San Diego, on what was supposed to be Kerr’s last deployment before moving to Ottawa to work at naval headquarters.

“I got on the treadmill

Article source: http://world.einnews.com/article/383665770/NmNjodpr3G3WHyKL?ref=rss&ecode=dYZEnKEuqPQMTccj

Here’s what could happen to America’s hundreds of dead malls

As one of the first post-war suburban shopping centers in the US, the Northgate Mall in northern Seattle defines classic mall architecture.

Its architect, John Graham Jr., pioneered the dumbbell, big-box shape for malls, in which two rows of stores face each other and two department stores anchor each end. Graham also gave Northgate Mall a grocery store (which later became a food court) and a huge parking lot. In the decades that followed, malls around the country copied Northgate’s layout, which became the model for most American malls throughout the late 20th century.

This design may not be working in the 21st century, however. Hundreds of malls and thousands of mall-based stores have shuttered in the past two decades, and many more may close within the next 10 years.

Traditional malls need to transform themselves to stay alive, and many are making changes to attract more business – including Northgate.

Developers are now turning many of the mall’s parking spaces into a light rail station, which will connect the neighborhood to downtown Seattle. Other parts of the lot have been turned into LEED-certified apartments, senior housing, a medical center, more retail space, and a bioswale that keeps runoff away from the nearby creek. Earlier in 2017, Northgate’s Sears closed and turned into a public library.

Malls of the future have an opportunity to fulfill other community needs besides commerce, June Williamson, a City College of New York architecture professor and the author of “Retrofitting Suburbia,”

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/homeandproperty/heres-what-could-happen-to-americas-hundreds-of-dead-malls/ss-BBBAyyq?srcref=rss

Here’s what could happen to America’s hundreds of dead malls

As one of the first post-war suburban shopping centers in the US, the Northgate Mall in northern Seattle defines classic mall architecture.

Its architect, John Graham Jr., pioneered the dumbbell, big-box shape for malls, in which two rows of stores face each other and two department stores anchor each end. Graham also gave Northgate Mall a grocery store (which later became a food court) and a huge parking lot. In the decades that followed, malls around the country copied Northgate’s layout, which became the model for most American malls throughout the late 20th century.

This design may not be working in the 21st century, however. Hundreds of malls and thousands of mall-based stores have shuttered in the past two decades, and many more may close within the next 10 years.

Traditional malls need to transform themselves to stay alive, and many are making changes to attract more business – including Northgate.

Developers are now turning many of the mall’s parking spaces into a light rail station, which will connect the neighborhood to downtown Seattle. Other parts of the lot have been turned into LEED-certified apartments, senior housing, a medical center, more retail space, and a bioswale that keeps runoff away from the nearby creek. Earlier in 2017, Northgate’s Sears closed and turned into a public library.

Malls of the future have an opportunity to fulfill other community needs besides commerce, June Williamson, a City College of New York architecture professor and the author of “Retrofitting Suburbia,”

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/homeandproperty/heres-what-could-happen-to-americas-hundreds-of-dead-malls/ss-BBBAyyq?srcref=rss

This ghost town is on sale for $2 million, and still nobody is buying



Johnsonville Connecticut ghost town for sale 2


© Provided by Business Insider
Johnsonville Connecticut ghost town for sale 2

Johnsonville, Connecticut, looks straight out of an episode of “Twin Peaks” — old mill included. But unlike the small town on TV, Johnsonville has been abandoned for nearly 20 years.

Located on 62 acres off the Connecticut River, Johnsonville is up for grabs at $1.9 million. An eccentric millionaire with the funds to spare will find green pastures, old-timey buildings, and the former owner’s mansion, which is rumored to be haunted by Mr. Johnson himself.

It’s now unoccupied, with the exception of a caretaker and a security guard who keeps aspiring ghost hunters and urban explorers from snooping around the grounds. Take a look at the town by clicking through the slideshow.





© Provided by Business Insider


Johnsonville, Connecticut, is the shell of a once booming mill town.





© Provided by Business Insider


Established in 1802, the little hamlet became an industrial center for twine production.





© Provided by Business Insider


A community rose up around the

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/homeandproperty/nobody-wants-to-buy-this-connecticut-ghost-town-thats-on-sale-for-dollar195-million/ar-BBBAFUc?srcref=rss

This ghost town is on sale for $2 million, and still nobody is buying



Johnsonville Connecticut ghost town for sale 2


© Provided by Business Insider
Johnsonville Connecticut ghost town for sale 2

Johnsonville, Connecticut, looks straight out of an episode of “Twin Peaks” — old mill included. But unlike the small town on TV, Johnsonville has been abandoned for nearly 20 years.

Located on 62 acres off the Connecticut River, Johnsonville is up for grabs at $1.9 million. An eccentric millionaire with the funds to spare will find green pastures, old-timey buildings, and the former owner’s mansion, which is rumored to be haunted by Mr. Johnson himself.

It’s now unoccupied, with the exception of a caretaker and a security guard who keeps aspiring ghost hunters and urban explorers from snooping around the grounds. Take a look at the town by clicking through the slideshow.





© Provided by Business Insider


Johnsonville, Connecticut, is the shell of a once booming mill town.





© Provided by Business Insider


Established in 1802, the little hamlet became an industrial center for twine production.





© Provided by Business Insider


A community rose up around the

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/homeandproperty/nobody-wants-to-buy-this-connecticut-ghost-town-thats-on-sale-for-dollar195-million/ar-BBBAFUc?srcref=rss

Canadians aren’t saving like they used to: Here’s what you should do