This penniless yoga superstar controls a multibillion-dollar corporation

© Bloomberg/Photo illustration: 731

Baba Ramdev renounced the material world. So why is he selling toothpaste, instant noodles and toilet cleaner?

Twenty-three years ago, when he was a poor young yoga instructor living at the foot of the Himalayas, Baba Ramdev pledged to spend the rest of his life as a sanyasi — a Hindu ascetic. He forswore possessions and renounced the material world.

But today he can be found in the most material of places. Turn on an Indian TV, and there’s Ramdev, a supple yoga megastar in saffron robes, demonstrating poses on one of the two stations he oversees. Flip the channel, and there’s Ramdev in commercials selling shampoo and dish soap. Walk any city on the subcontinent, and there’s his face in stores selling the wares of Patanjali Ayurved Ltd., the multibillion-dollar corporation he controls.

Ramdev has said his goal is to sell an ayurvedic item, based on India’s ancient medical traditions, for every household need: toothpaste made from cloves, nee, and turmeric; hand soap made from almonds, saffron and tea tree oil; floor cleaner made from the “natural disinfectant” cow urine. Since 2012, Patanjali’s revenue has climbed twentyfold, from $69 million to $1.6 billion. It’s the fastest-growing company in Indian consumer goods, and Ramdev predicts he will overtake the subsidiaries of multinational giants such as Nestlé SA and Unilever NV as soon as next year. “The ‘gate’ in Colgate

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/companies/this-multibillion-dollar-corporation-is-controlled-by-a-penniless-yoga-superstar/ar-BBKm347?srcref=rss

This penniless yoga superstar controls a multibillion-dollar corporation

© Bloomberg/Photo illustration: 731

Baba Ramdev renounced the material world. So why is he selling toothpaste, instant noodles and toilet cleaner?

Twenty-three years ago, when he was a poor young yoga instructor living at the foot of the Himalayas, Baba Ramdev pledged to spend the rest of his life as a sanyasi — a Hindu ascetic. He forswore possessions and renounced the material world.

But today he can be found in the most material of places. Turn on an Indian TV, and there’s Ramdev, a supple yoga megastar in saffron robes, demonstrating poses on one of the two stations he oversees. Flip the channel, and there’s Ramdev in commercials selling shampoo and dish soap. Walk any city on the subcontinent, and there’s his face in stores selling the wares of Patanjali Ayurved Ltd., the multibillion-dollar corporation he controls.

Ramdev has said his goal is to sell an ayurvedic item, based on India’s ancient medical traditions, for every household need: toothpaste made from cloves, nee, and turmeric; hand soap made from almonds, saffron and tea tree oil; floor cleaner made from the “natural disinfectant” cow urine. Since 2012, Patanjali’s revenue has climbed twentyfold, from $69 million to $1.6 billion. It’s the fastest-growing company in Indian consumer goods, and Ramdev predicts he will overtake the subsidiaries of multinational giants such as Nestlé SA and Unilever NV as soon as next year. “The ‘gate’ in Colgate

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/companies/this-multibillion-dollar-corporation-is-controlled-by-a-penniless-yoga-superstar/ar-BBKm347?srcref=rss

25 things more likely to happen to you than winning the lottery

Americans spent more than $80 billion on lottery tickets in 2016 — more than they spent on books, movie tickets, music, video games, and sports tickets –combined. The reason why is clear: Lotteries offer the chance of striking it rich. Plenty of jackpots in recent years have offered hundreds of millions of dollars.

There’s a problem, though: While the potential payoff may be astronomic, the chance of winning it is microscopic. The odds of winning the Powerball or Mega Millions grand prize are, respectively, 1 in 292,201,338 and 1 in 302,575,350. There are about 327 million people in America, so it’s almost like randomly picking one resident as the winner.

Click ahead to see 25 things more likely to happen to you than winning the lottery.

ALSO READ: Maybe You Were Better Off Not Winning the Lottery Jackpot

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/personalfinance/25-things-more-likely-to-happen-to-you-than-winning-the-lottery/ss-BBKmcGr?srcref=rss

After overcharging for bread, Loblaws demand ID for a $25 gift card

Many people who have received the ID request from Loblaws are incensed that they must hand over sensitive personal data to a company thats admitted to wrongdoing.© Evan Mitsui/CBC
Many people who have received the ID request from Loblaws are incensed that they must hand over sensitive personal data to a company that’s admitted to wrongdoing.

Jenn Iskiw says she’ll be grocery shopping elsewhere after feeling betrayed by Loblaws — twice.

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First, for artificially inflating the price of bread for 14 years, and second, for demanding she send ID to get a $25 gift card offered as compensation for bread price fixing.

“It was bad enough they committed fraud,” says Iskiw who lives in Victoria. “[Now] Loblaws is treating me like a criminal.”

Many people across Canada who have received the ID request are incensed that they’ve been asked to hand over sensitive personal data to a company that’s admitted to wrongdoing.

a close up of text on a white surface: Robyn Fleming in St. John's was displeased to get an email from Loblaws requesting she send identification before getting her $25 gift card.© Robyn Fleming
Robyn Fleming in St. John’s was displeased to get an email from Loblaws requesting she send identification before getting her $25

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstories/after-overcharging-for-bread-should-loblaws-demand-id-for-a-dollar25-gift-card/ar-BBKmEKl?srcref=rss

25 things more likely to happen to you than winning the lottery

Americans spent more than $80 billion on lottery tickets in 2016 — more than they spent on books, movie tickets, music, video games, and sports tickets –combined. The reason why is clear: Lotteries offer the chance of striking it rich. Plenty of jackpots in recent years have offered hundreds of millions of dollars.

There’s a problem, though: While the potential payoff may be astronomic, the chance of winning it is microscopic. The odds of winning the Powerball or Mega Millions grand prize are, respectively, 1 in 292,201,338 and 1 in 302,575,350. There are about 327 million people in America, so it’s almost like randomly picking one resident as the winner.

Click ahead to see 25 things more likely to happen to you than winning the lottery.

ALSO READ: Maybe You Were Better Off Not Winning the Lottery Jackpot

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/personalfinance/25-things-more-likely-to-happen-to-you-than-winning-the-lottery/ss-BBKmcGr?srcref=rss

After overcharging for bread, Loblaws demand ID for a $25 gift card

Many people who have received the ID request from Loblaws are incensed that they must hand over sensitive personal data to a company thats admitted to wrongdoing.© Evan Mitsui/CBC
Many people who have received the ID request from Loblaws are incensed that they must hand over sensitive personal data to a company that’s admitted to wrongdoing.

Jenn Iskiw says she’ll be grocery shopping elsewhere after feeling betrayed by Loblaws — twice.

Popular Searches

0000


ISPVX


TSP60


TX40

First, for artificially inflating the price of bread for 14 years, and second, for demanding she send ID to get a $25 gift card offered as compensation for bread price fixing.

“It was bad enough they committed fraud,” says Iskiw who lives in Victoria. “[Now] Loblaws is treating me like a criminal.”

Many people across Canada who have received the ID request are incensed that they’ve been asked to hand over sensitive personal data to a company that’s admitted to wrongdoing.

a close up of text on a white surface: Robyn Fleming in St. John's was displeased to get an email from Loblaws requesting she send identification before getting her $25 gift card.© Robyn Fleming
Robyn Fleming in St. John’s was displeased to get an email from Loblaws requesting she send identification before getting her $25

Article source: http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstories/after-overcharging-for-bread-should-loblaws-demand-id-for-a-dollar25-gift-card/ar-BBKmEKl?srcref=rss